Pre Narrow Cases -

The earliest part of the Ducati history I
know the least about, but I must say I
am very interested to learn more
about.  During the 1950's and into the
beginning of the 1960's Ducati's
interest in racing and production bikes
were all small displacement engines
less than 250cc.

Motorcycles to the right were
photographed in Mid Ohio in July of
2005 in the public area and flea
market.



LINKS
Real Classics - 125 Rebuild - Part 1

Real Classics - 125 Rebuild - Part 2
NYDESMO.COM
HOME PAGE
This letter came to me in November 2005.  The
excitement and enthusiasm shared is what the hobby
means to me and why I want to share it  To the right is
Jack's Cellar and bikes and one of the most beautiful
photo expressions of our hobby I have seen.  I hope you
enjoy Jack's letter as much as I did.




Hi Greg,

I was pointed to your site by a fellow in Holland, via the Ducati
Club of Canada web site---the world is shrinking!

Loved the site and all the info.  I was at the Moto Giro Brewery
Stop--I live ear there, and loved seeing all the bikes--just the
ones I lusted for back in '68 when I was 13.  While I don't
remember seeing your MV there, I will look back in my photos
to see if I can spot it.   What were you parked near?

The Moto Giro got me so excited I went out and bought a 1965
Ducati Monza Jr. project that I will hopefully ride in the tour next
year.  I childhood friend bought it in 1971 and drove it in the
fields until one day around '73 it would not start so he rolled it
into a corner of the barn.  My brother bought it from him a few
years later and it sat in our barn.  Around 83 I bought it from
him to trade on another bike or car-can't remember which.  A
few years later my brother bought it back and it sat in the barn
more until 2 days after the MG when I bought it from him.  Up to
this time it had yet to run. I looked it over and ordered a few
parts from road and race, then discovered Domi Racer and got
a few more from them.  I found the books confusing and could
not decide if it was a magneto or altenator ign, and nearly set it
on fire when I hooked the new battery directly to the coil.  We
also noticed that the timing marks on the cam sprocket didn't
line up as they should.

Well, yesterday my brother and nephew came for Thanksgiving
dinner, and as we always do we retired to the cellar to work on
a motorcycle, either the duc or my basket Tiger Cub.  We
decided on the Duc, and after some figuring, we got it
running---1st time in 30 years!  We figured it was a magneto,
raised the head and lined up the timing marks, sprayed some
carb cleaner in the intake and kicked it over- boom, blue flame
out the intake so.....switched the auto advance plate around,
sprayed in a bit more cleaner and boom--it ran!!!  

We were overjoyed.  Now I need to finish assembling it, then
take it outside and see if it will go.  The only bad thing about it
was that I ended up not needing any of the $200 worth of parts
I purchased.

I write the above as I figure as a bike guy you would enjoy the
saga and understand why I am so happy.

Would you be willing to help me with questions I may have as I
work on the bike?   I see you writing about NY==where are you
located?  I am Up State in Walton NY, near Oneonta or
Cooperstown.

Do you know how I can register for next years Moto Giro?  I am
hoping to have both the Ducati and Triumph ready by then.

Thanks for listening,
Jack
The blue bike on this page
is a 1964 125cc BRONCO.  
Not the sexiest of bikes but
an all original that has been
repainted.  The Bronco's
motor is an absolute work
of art and its details just
wonderful.

This bike came to me
through a friend who was
interested in Harley's ... it
seemed that a friend of a
friend had bought a little
"1976" 125cc Ducati for his
brother to learn how to ride
on ... and after the said
brother was not interested,
his very nice brother was
interested to part ways with
what you see.
The blue bike on this page
is a 1964 125cc BRONCO.  
Not the sexiest of bikes but
an all original that has been
repainted.  The Bronco's
motor is an absolute work
of art and its details just
wonderful.

This bike came to me
through a friend who was
interested in Harley's ... it
seemed that a friend of a
friend had bought a little
"1976" 125cc Ducati for his
brother to learn how to ride
on ... and after the said
brother showed no interest,
his very nice brother was
interested to part ways with
what you see.
1956 125T - From Ebay - Description
is from the advertisement.

This bike is of historical significance to
Ducati collectors as this model was an
interim model only made for about one
year. It is derived from the 98T and still
has the early style open frame. By
1957 the 125T and 125TV were both
made with a duplex cradle frame.

125cc overhead valve 4 stroke. 4
speed. Manufacturer claims a top
speed of 85 kilometers per hour
(probably down hill with a tail wind!)
This is not a rocket ship but a rare and
interesting addition to any serious
Ducati collection. It is also totally
eligible in the 125cc class of the
California Moto Giro in Septemb